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Title

Enhancing Warfighter Effectiveness with Wearable Bio-Sensors and Physiological Models

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11/07/2018

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HFM

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3590

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HFM-260 “Enhancing Warfighter Effectiveness with Wearable Bio-Sensors and Physiological Models”
Cooperative Demonstration of Technology (CDT)
Commando Training Center, Royal Marines, Lympstone, UK





Pictured:  Simon Delves from the Institute of Naval Medicine, UK briefs visitors on the real time thermal work strain data transmitted from Royal Marines during a speed march (left); Royal Marines with boot-worn inertial monitoring units that provide dead reckoning information and movement patterns for soldiers operating in urban environments (right).


NATO STO HFM Panel 260 conducted a very successful demonstration of current wearable physiological monitoring concept systems with a group of Royal Marine Commandos who wore the systems while conducting their normal training, including a speed march.  This Concept Demonstration highlighted the feasibility of noninvasive (“wear and forget”) systems that can provide real time actionable information to leaders during intensive training.  Near term applications of wearable physiological monitoring technologies in training involve thermal strain and musculoskeletal/workload fatigue and injury risk.  This has been a focus of the panel, along with continuous coordination on development of wearable, accurate, reliable devices, and coordinated multinational research.  The CDT included network-integrated systems from the US and UK providing personal, local, and remote presentation of heat injury mitigation technology, and subsets of Royal Marines wore the Royal Netherlands Army physical demands ARMOR system, the Swiss Axiamo PADIS 2.0, or the University of Parma Dead Reckoning System.

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NATO STO HFM Panel 260 conducted a very successful demonstration of current wearable physiological monitoring concept systems with a group of Royal Marine Commandos who wore the systems while conducting their normal training, including a speed march.

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HFM-260 “Enhancing Warfighter Effectiveness with Wearable Bio-Sensors and Physiological Models”
Cooperative Demonstration of Technology (CDT)
Commando Training Center, Royal Marines, Lympstone, UK





Pictured:  Simon Delves from the Institute of Naval Medicine, UK briefs visitors on the real time thermal work strain data transmitted from Royal Marines during a speed march (left); Royal Marines with boot-worn inertial monitoring units that provide dead reckoning information and movement patterns for soldiers operating in urban environments (right).


NATO STO HFM Panel 260 conducted a very successful demonstration of current wearable physiological monitoring concept systems with a group of Royal Marine Commandos who wore the systems while conducting their normal training, including a speed march.  This Concept Demonstration highlighted the feasibility of noninvasive (“wear and forget”) systems that can provide real time actionable information to leaders during intensive training.  Near term applications of wearable physiological monitoring technologies in training involve thermal strain and musculoskeletal/workload fatigue and injury risk.  This has been a focus of the panel, along with continuous coordination on development of wearable, accurate, reliable devices, and coordinated multinational research.  The CDT included network-integrated systems from the US and UK providing personal, local, and remote presentation of heat injury mitigation technology, and subsets of Royal Marines wore the Royal Netherlands Army physical demands ARMOR system, the Swiss Axiamo PADIS 2.0, or the University of Parma Dead Reckoning System.

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Created at 11/07/2018 09:41 by System Account
Last modified at 11/07/2018 09:41 by System Account