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Activity title

Framework for Modeling and Simulation of Human Lethality, Injury, and Impairment from Blast-Related Threats

Activity Reference

HFM-270

Panel

Human Factors and Medicine

Security Classification

PUBLIC RELEASE

Status

Active

Activity type

RTG

Start date

2016

End date

2019

Keywords

biomedical research, Blast injury, blast injury prevention, computational modeling, modeling and simulation

Background

Explosive weapons are a continuing source of casualties in NATO operations. The spectrum of operational scenarios involving these blast threats is broad, and includes both mounted and dismounted operations. A novel approach is required to rapidly design and test protection systems that can mitigate or prevent blast injuries. Biomedical blast injury research in the U.S. has demonstrated the power of computational modeling, tightly coupled with biomedical research, to elucidate tissue-level mechanisms of blast injury needed to design and test protection systems for individuals and occupants of combat platforms. The proposed effort will leverage previous, ongoing, and planned blast injury biomedical research and computational modeling efforts among the participating nations. This effort is a logical follow-on to HFM-207/SYM (2011) and HFM-234/RTG (2013-2016) which highlighted requirements for biomedically-valid computational models of blast injury that incorporate both biomechanical and physiological responses.

Objectives

To leverage previous, ongoing, and planned blast injury biomedical research and computational modeling efforts among the participating nations to develop a framework for translating scientific information into the capability to model the mechanisms of human lethality, injury, and impairment across the spectrum of blast-related threats. The proposed RTG will also develop the framework for creating and evaluating effective systems that protect against these blast-related threats.

Topics

• Computational modeling of human lethality, injury, and impairment from blast threats, in both mounted and dismounted scenarios; • Previous, ongoing, and planned blast injury biomedical research and computational modeling efforts, and how these fit into overarching frameworks for understanding mechanisms of injury and development of protective systems; • Identification of the gaps that remain in the mechanisms of blast-related injury and in understanding how to adequately protect from these injuries.

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