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Activity title

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Post Concussive Symptoms in a Deployed Setting

Activity Reference

HFM-240

Panel

Human Factors and Medicine

Security Classification

PUBLIC RELEASE

Status

Active

Activity type

RLS

Start date

2013

End date

2016

Keywords

brain, concussion, injury, mTBI, traumatic, traumatic brain injury

Background

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)/post concussiove symptoms (PCS) is a relevant military issue due to its incidence and prevalence both in deployed and non-deployed settings. Although explosive blast predominates as the primary mechanism of injury in current NATO conflicts, other mechanisms such as falls and motor vehicle crashes may contribute to the symptom manifestation and must be taken into account. Acutely, symptoms from mTBI/PCS adversely may impact operational readiness of the individual or unit. In most cases, the acute effects are of short duration, but there is an small minority that has a prolonged course of recovery. This may impact both the health of the individual in the short term, their ability to remain in theatre, and may potentially affect their capability to deploy in the future if symptoms fail to remit. Evidence-based public health policy is best served by the use of a rational evaluation framework such as Population Impact Analysis. Such organizing frameworks can be used to apply evidence from the literature to estimating the impact of implementing programs or policies for any given health issue on the local population.

Objectives

Cumulative research findings can help military leaders and nations understand existing clinical practice guidelines for the management of mTBI/PCS in a military operational setting that are currently employed by a number of NATO countries, summarize key research findings where relevant, and identify key principles for best practices in the management of mTBI/PCS in the deployed setting. Therefore, it is important to organize and carry out a RTO Lecture series (RLS) to disseminate the results among operational communities in NATO and Partner nations.

Topics

Cumulative research findings can help military leaders and nations understand existing clinical practice guidelines for the management of mTBI/PCS in a military operational setting that are currently employed by a number of NATO countries, summarize key research findings where relevant, and identify key principles for best practices in the management of mTBI/PCS in the deployed setting. Therefore, it is important to organize and carry out a RTO Lecture series (RLS) to disseminate the results among operational communities in NATO and Partner nations. (1) A RTO Lecture series (RLS) will be organized and conducted; (2) The RLS will cover the following key topics and dimensions: a description of existing clinical practice for all participating NATO countries; a summary of current research projects and predicted target dates for completion; identification of existing gaps in knowledge; and principles for best practices. Specific topics to be addressed will include: the potential Impact of mTBI/PCS on Military Operations; the significance of explosive blasts as a mechanism of injury; description of existing Clinical Practice Guidelines; and, the key features of mTBI/PCS and the co-occurrence and overlap with mental health problems such as PTSD; (3) The specific deliverables will include the development of a lecture series with slides and notes which will be conducted at two European locations and one North American location by speakers; (4) The duration of the Technical Team will be for a period of two years.

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